mindful living, effortless style

featuredraisingcreativekid

Must Read: Raising a Creative Kid

Would you like to raise a kid who is creative? Would you like to see the twinkle that passes through your kids eye when she has an idea… and know exactly how to nurture it?

What if I said there was a way for you to raise a creative thinker by simply setting up a creative environment, using intentional language, and nurturing mistakes?  What if the answer was as easy as following simple strategies all laid out for you? 


Sounds pretty good right?  Those words were written by my blogging friend Jillian in regards to her brand new eBook Raising a Creative Kid:  Simple Strategies for Igniting and Nurturing that Creative Spark.  She kindly forwarded me a review copy a few weeks ago and I was so impressed by the clear and concise nature of the book.  

I also really appreciated that it was a super quick read (available for your kindle, ipad, android, iphone, PC, etc.) and only $8!

When I finished I had a ton of easy take-aways that I was able to immediately implement in my kids’ daily lives. Which is fabulous because I believe that teaching our kids how to approach their world creatively is one of the most important gifts we can give them.  Especially at this time when our country is badly in need of a next generation of innovators and creative thinkers (aka the creativity crisis).

Because I’m such a big fan of this quick read (perfect for summer), I asked to be an affiliate.  I also asked Jillian if she’d mind sharing with us a little more about herself and her motivations for writing the book.  She graciously agreed and I got to do my first ever mini-interview (look out Oprah, here I come).  Without further ado, here it is…
———–

Tell us a little about yourself and your experience working with children and parents.


I have a degree in Early Childhood Education and 10 years experience as a preschool teacher.  I loved being in the classroom but being a stay at home mom has always been my dream. I love that my students call me Mom.

In today’s world, why is it important to raise creative children?

If we think of creativity as problem solving it’s easy to see why creativity in our kids is so important. Since it is impossible to know what situations or opportunities will be presented to our kids we want them to be prepared to creatively handle anything that may come along.

What are your top tips for “non-creative” parents who feel intimidated about how to play and create with their kids?

Oh, I love this question.  It really cuts to the heart of Raising a Creative Kid.  Creativity can be overwhelming if you think in terms of what is difficult for you.  I am not an artist, and if I tried to find creativity in my drawing I would surely be frustrated and defeated.  

The great thing about creativity, though, is that it looks different in every person.  You might be creative with numbers, creative with ideas, creatie with social situations.  Finding places where you are already creative and focusing on those will help grow your confidence, nurturing your creative spirit.  Imagine how much learning your kids will absorb by being a part of your creative process!


One of the most interesting sections of your new eBook tackles how language influences creativity. Can you talk briefly about what an open-ended question is and how it fosters creativity?

I love open-ended questions. Open-ended questions can be answered in many different ways and require kids to really think about their answer. “How are you going to use those train pieces?”  Open-ended questions are prefect for expanding on your little one’s creative process because they is no pressure. There is no right or wrong answer. 

A perfectly timed open-ended question just might help your little one work out a problem they have been struggling with. It’s amazing what they can come up with once you get them talking.

———–



See?  Didn’t I tell you Jillian was great?  And one last thing I forgot to mention about Raising a Creative Kid: Simple Strategies for Igniting and Nurturing that Creative Spark, it contains creative exercises following each section so that, in Jillian’s words, moving into a creative lifestyle is as easy as possible.  And she does so with recommend materials that are inexpensive or free.  

To get your copy, visit Jillian’s sales page here.

Similar Stuff:MPMK Read Along: Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children – Becoming a Mindful Parent

 

line-graphic


 

We're teaming up with Dyson to help you get your home clean & organized.
 
This week, win ALL of MPMK's eBooks & Printables!


MPMK Printables & eBooks

a Rafflecopter giveaway


 

line-graphic


P.S. Looking for more ways to simplify and connect with your family?



Special holiday offer!
 

line-graphic


MPMK's Famous Toy Gift Guides

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Heather July 20, 2012 at 5:24 pm

I am sure it’s a great book! I just don’t have time to sit and read anything right now. But my 4 1/2 year old son and 3 year old daughter have not yet played with an iPad, Kindle, laptop, or computer. They have a few child electronic toys, but they really enjoy playing more with things that don’t make noise or light up. When the batteries die on something, we wait to replace them a few days, weeks, or months!

Our son is very inventive and creative at building train track layouts, houses, and more. He loves to build with wooden train track, legos, wooden blocks, and more. He has a really good imagination. Our daughter plays by herself too with the same things, she also plays with her baby dolls, ponies, books, she loves books, her cupcake kitchen, and more! We read to our children 2 to 3 books every night, and we read to them during the day too.

We do own a leapfrog explorer and a leappad. I am a blogger, and I got the leappad for free in exchange for hosting a leappad party. Which we combined with our son’s 4th birthday. We bring those out on special occasions only and every few months. They don’t get to play with them often at all, and when we take them away, they don’t ask for them!

Creativity is one of the main reasons that our children have not had a chance to use computers or iPads yet. I don’t even own an iPad. We just feel that they would make better people and better adults if they learn to use their minds and imaginations first, like we did when we were little.

Reply

Ginger August 19, 2012 at 12:58 am

I haven’t read the book yet, but I’m intrigued and adding it to my “to read” list!

I just read another book that was revolutionary called The Well-Trained Mind, and while I would have originally agreed that children are inherintly creative, she proposes that children need to be filled with great ideas and great literature and great thoughts before they’re asked to spit out their own stuff. Something to think about at least.

{The book itself is on home-education, which is a bit intense for most folks (thought it caused me to rethink education as a whole as well), but so many of the concepts are relevant, whether or not you home educate or send off to traditional school.}

Reply

Leave a Comment

{ 1 trackback }